I don’t know about you, but I like easy. Doesn’t matter if we’re talking work, home, church, or any other aspect of our lives, I prefer the simplest approach. The less complex the better, I say.

To be honest however, it can be challenging to live a simpler life, especially in light of the fact that all of us are immersed in a world of technology that grows more complex by the day.

I love technology. I love seeing new ideas that increase productivity and efficiency. I like technology that allows us to work smarter instead of harder. If you really think about it though, the improvements that have come about because of technological advances are a two-edged sword.

Having the power of the computer in a small handheld device is great, that is until that same device becomes master of your life and you cannot function without it.

            the journal.com

While Google, Siri, and Alexa may seem like a modern version of Aladdin’s Lamp, able to grant our wishes on command, the price these devices extract from us leaves us in the precarious position of trying to protect what little privacy we have left. The massive amounts of data they are collecting could easily leave us “exposed” should it fall into the wrong hands.

All around me are grocery stores that provide internet ordering from the comfort of my home. Were I to use this service, never again would I have to contend with screaming kids, little old ladies who park their cart in the middle of the aisle, or old men who have to call their wives because they either forgot what they were sent to buy or because “they’re out of that”.

The cost of this convenience? Not much, unless you consider yet another database collecting information on your eating and shopping habits ‘not much’.

All of this begs the question: is this what Jesus was referring to when he spoke of the Abundant Life? Does having an endless array of conveniences at our fingertips mean we’re living “our best life now”?

If it is, whatever happened to “and having food and clothing be content”(1 Ti. 6:8)? Or the Apostle Paul informing us that he had learned that in whatever state he found himself to be in, he was content?

Not that I speak in regard to need, for I have learned in whatever state I am, to be content: I know how to be abased, and I know how to abound. Everywhere and in all things I have learned both to be full and to be hungry, both to abound and to suffer need. I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. Philippians 4:11-13

Maybe it’s just me, but I don’t see a whole lot of “being content” these days. From where I sit what I see is a constant clamor for more and more, with people not realizing until it’s too late that “more” brings with it it’s own set of complications.

Peace and quiet are a welcome relief from the maddening pace of the world today. Of course, the world has its own versions of those as well, but I think I’ll stay with Jesus’ version, thank you.

Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you.  John 14:27

Like all of you, my home is filled with gadgets of every sort. Computers, cell phones, iPads, TV’s, and some I’ve long forgotten about.

For all of that however, when I come home and walk through the door I am immediately greeted by a sense of peace and calm. There is only one reason for that, and it is because the peace of God envelops our home.

In the midst of a complex society where technology seems to have won the upper hand over our lives, the peace that Jesus brings restores order out of the chaos.

And that, my friends, is about as uncomplicated as it gets!

Be blessed

Ron

 

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