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The reality of God in the midst of suffering

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A lot of people in this world question the reality of God, especially when a catastrophic event takes place in their life.

A sudden loss of life, a devastating report from the doctor, or suddenly finding yourself out of work with a mountain of bills to pay can cause us to ask “God, where are you?”

Being a firm believer in the fact that God reigns over the universe, which includes you and I, I’ve often pondered the issue of human suffering from a Biblical perspective. [1]

I know, I know, I’ve got too much time on my hands, right?

Without trying to come off like some sort of expert on the matter, which I surely am not, I wonder why it is that in this enlightened age of knowledge and power that we brilliant humans have not eradicated human suffering once and for all.

For example, the trials, hardships, adversities, and tests of this life transcend all economic barriers and social classes. They show no favoritism or prejudice. Every one of us “gets” to participate in them.

Every person, regardless of age or nationality, regardless of religious or political affiliation, all of us seem predestined at some point to walk the lonely paths of these human maladies.

From where I sit it would seem that these life issues are handed out randomly, without discretion, thought or (human) reason as to who can deal best with a particular trial.

Of course, I have no way of knowing whether such a thing actually happens, or if there is some far off Heavenly committee that meets on a frequent basis to decide such things, but believing that God reigns, also brings with it several practical questions.

For example, if God really is in charge, then where is He when…

  • Evil people are blowing up innocent men, women, and children?
  • The helpless and innocent are starving to death?
  • A Christian marriage falls apart?
  • Our children, raised in Godly homes, decide they want no part of living for Jesus?

Where exactly is God when all of these things are happening? Isn’t that what most reasonable people want to know? Just where is God when people are suffering?

These are hard, tough questions, aren’t they?

And more times than not, these hard questions are not easily dismissed with a cursory “well, God is in charge, so He must know what He’s doing” answer.

The truth is, God does know exactly what he is doing, just as he knew what he was doing when he created man the way that he did.

You see, we were/are created in His image. That means we were made to resemble God. Of course, God is not flesh and blood as man is, but we understand that the first man Adam was created in perfection.

Being created in the image of God sets human beings apart from the rest of creation, such as the animal, or plant worlds, for example.

We were also created to have dominion over the earth, to have the ability to commune with God, and to establish a relationship with him.

So, what does this brief foray into the story of man’s creation have to do with the hard questions I posed?

Essentially this; man was created with attributes that no other part of creation was granted. Because we were created in His image and likeness, we were given the ability to choose, think, and reason.

It is precisely because of these unique, Godly attributes that Satan appeared in the garden. His mission: to corrupt this perfect, created image of God, and convince man to use his Godly attributes for evil.

Adam and Eve made a terrible decision when they chose to rebel against their Creator. They were told that death would be the result of their disobedience, should they choose to do so, yet they did it anyway.

By choosing their way vs. God’s way, they marred the image of God within themselves, and in doing so passed the damage on to every single person who would ever be born. That includes all of us, in case you didn’t know that. [2]

Unbeknownst to Adam and Eve, because of their careless disobedience,the thought process of mankind was forever altered that day. In one disastrous moment, man was changed from a ‘pure in thought’ worshiper of God to a being possessing the potential for unlimited evil.

Sadly, we now see that unlimited potential for evil being played out without reservation all over this world. The powers of choice and reason, Godly attributes once solely used for good, are now the weapons of individuals wholly given over to the ideology of evil.

Today of course, man is still created in the image of God, but there is a difference now. Because of what happened in that garden, we now bear the scars of sin. [3]

Mentally, morally, socially, and physically, we bear the inescapable effects of sin. The evil and immorality that we are seeing displayed on a daily basis in our world is the result of this corruption.

Every single one of those hard questions I posed can be traced back to the fall in the garden of Eden, when Satan corrupted the pure thoughts of God’s highest creation.

And yes, I am aware of just how simplistic that sounds. Everyone knows that the problems this world is facing are very complex, and that (supposedly) the greatest minds available are working hard to find solutions.

Speaking only for myself, just once I would like to hear someone on a national platform stand up and say what a lot of us already know: that whatever it is we’re doing to make things better, it isn’t working.

And it never will work.

Which is why God sent the antidote for our sin sickness in the person of his Son, Jesus Christ.

What man ruined in the garden of Eden, God restored on an old rugged cross.

Does God still rule and reign today, even in the midst of human suffering?

Of course He does! He reigns in the hearts of all who have made him Lord. He said he would never leave us or forsake us. [4]

No matter what comes, I have this assurance, that He will be by my side and in my heart at all times!

Be blessed,

Ron

[1] 1st Chron. 16:31, Psalms 97:1, 99:1, 146:10, Isaiah 52:7

[2] Romans 5:12

[3] James 3:9

[4] Hebrews 13:5

 

 

 

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A personal God. A personal Father.

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The word “Father” is an important one in nearly every society. To some, Father denotes the elder, or leader of the family. Others use the word Father when referring to someone who originated something, like the Father of a particular industry.

In today’s post however, I want us to look at how God was first revealed as our Father.

In the prelude leading up to Jesus teaching his disciples about how they should pray, on no less than five occasions do we find Jesus referring to God as “your Father”.         Scripture reference Matt. 6:1-9

Why is this important? It is important because with the words “your Father” Jesus did something that had never been done before.

He personalized Almighty God by attributing to Him an intimate nature.

Think about that statement. I cannot find one instance in the Old Testament where the Jews ever referred to God as their Father in the first person. When I first realized this I was stunned!

To think that the God who revealed Himself to mankind, first in the garden and then throughout the Old Testament history of the Jews, was never thought of in a personal way as Father was almost unbelievable.

In fact, studies have been done (by real scholars) of every book of the Old Testament, as well as every known Jewish writing up until about the tenth century, and there is not one single reference of a Jewish person addressing God personally as their Father.

This makes Jesus referring to God as “your Father” all the more remarkable!

As a matter of fact, the very first Jewish rabbi known to have called God “Father” was Jesus of Nazareth!  In Judaism, this was such a radical departure from tradition that it cannot be overstated in its importance.

So great was the Jews anger against Jesus for suggesting that God could have an intimate relationship with man, that He was somehow approachable by mere mortals, that it incited the Jews to want to destroy Jesus.

To refer to the One True God as “Father” was unthinkable to the Jews, who would have deemed such a name as disrespectful. Of course, they used many distinct names for God; in fact in the Old Testament they used as many as sixteen different names that were deemed appropriate when addressing God. Perhaps you have heard most of these?
* El Shaddai (Lord God Almighty)
* El Elyon (The Most High God)
* Adonai (Lord, Master)
* Yahweh (Lord, Jehovah)
* Jehovah Nissi (The Lord My Banner)
* Jehovah-Raah (The Lord My Shepherd)
* Jehovah Rapha (The Lord That Heals)
* Jehovah Shammah (The Lord Is There)
* Jehovah Tsidkenu (The Lord Our Righteousness)
* Jehovah Mekoddishkem (The Lord Who Sanctifies You)
* El Olam (The Everlasting God)
* Elohim (God)
* Qanna (Jealous)
* Jehovah Jireh (The Lord Will Provide)
* Jehovah Shalom (The Lord Is Peace)
* Jehovah Sabaoth (The Lord of Hosts)

None of these names, however, refer to Him as “Father”. They are all names that reflect Holiness, Worship, and respect. They reflect upon his many incredible attributes.

In revealing the intimate nature of God by referring to Him as “our Father”, Jesus introduced to mankind the concept that God Almighty was also approachable.

Jesus revealed to the world for the first time that God was not some cold, unfeeling entity in a galaxy far, far away. No, Jesus pulled back the curtain of religious mystique and revealed God as Father, a title that suggests intimacy and personal relationship.

Because scripture teaches us that God has adopted us into his family and made us joint heirs with his only Son, we have been granted the right and the privilege to come into the presence of God and call him Father.

“For all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God. For you did not receive the spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received the Spirit of adoption as sons, by whom we cry, “Abba! Father!” The Spirit himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God, and if children, then heirs—heirs of God and fellow heirs with Christ, provided we suffer with him in order that we may also be glorified with him.”           Romans 8:14-17

A personal God, a personal Father, has adopted us into His family. We belong to Him, and as such we can call Him our Father.

I don’t know about you, but it doesn’t get any better than this for me.

Be blessed, and have a wonderful day,

Ron